Each year, according to a National Safety Council study, electrical fires lead to approximately 4,000 injuries and over 300 deaths in workplaces, including those which occur in restaurants. Electrical safety does not rest solely on the shoulders of restaurant owners and managers. Safety concerns should also be a responsibility shared by employees. Protect your restaurant from electrical accidents by training yourself, as well as every employee, on how to recognize electrical fire hazards.

  • Always follow manufacturer’s instructions when operating cooking equipment and kitchen appliances.
  • Regularly inspect all electrical cords for cuts, frays and other signs of damage. Replace damaged cords immediately!
  • Never overload electrical outlets or circuits.
  • Avoid using extension cords as permanent electrical solutions.
  • Provide heavy-duty extension cords and power strips for employees to use so a single cord or circuit is not overloaded.
  • Install ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI) on electrical outlets located near water sources.
  • Only use kitchen equipment that has been approved by an independent testing laboratory.
  • Be certain exposed electrical boxes are made of a non-conductive material, such as plastic.
  • Make sure all circuit breakers and fuses are properly labeled.
  • Switch off circuit breakers at the first sign of equipment malfunction or electrical fire.
  • Never use damaged electrical equipment. Replace the equipment or have a qualified, licensed electrician make necessary repairs.
  • Teach employees how to shut off the power in the event of an emergency.
  • Keep power cords well away from equipment when in use.
  • Make sure workers pull on the plug, not the cord, when unplugging equipment.
  • Do not touch the prongs of a plug when inserting into an outlet.
  • Never plug something into an outlet if the cord is wet, or when an employee is touching or standing on a wet surface.
  • Avoid using extension cords as permanent electrical solutions.
  • Never use extension cords that feel warm when used; as this is an indication they are overloaded.
  • Keep workplace walkways free from tripping hazards by using ceiling outlets when running longer electrical cords.
  • Train employees to never touch or attempt to help someone who is being shocked until the power has been turned off.
  • Hire only licensed professional electricians to service electrical systems.

These tips are courtesy of our carrier partner Capital Insurance Group (CIG), a leader in restaurant insurance. Please contact us for more information on how to protect your restaurant and to get a quote. Little steps can prevent big losses!